What To Do In An Earthquake – Good Advice!

Earthquakes in Oklahoma, whatever the reason, are increasing in frequency. It’s time we learn how best to act during them. This article contains well researched advice. If you get nothing else from it, pay attention to the description of the “triangle of life” close to the end of the post. It could save your life.

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Source:DavidIcke.com, March 30, 2011
[News From Behind the Scenes: March 31, 2011 @ 6:25 PM]


‘My name is Doug Copp. I am the Rescue Chief and Disaster Manager of the American Rescue Team International (ARTI ), the world’s most experienced rescue team. The information in this article will save lives in an earthquake.’

EXTRACT FROM DOUG COPP’S ARTICLE ON ‘THE TRIANGLE OF LIFE’

I have crawled inside 875 collapsed buildings, worked with rescue teams from 60 countries, founded rescue teams in several countries, and I am a member of many rescue teams from many countries. I was the United Nations expert in Disaster Mitigation for two years, and have worked at every major disaster in the world since 1985, except for simultaneous disasters.

The first building I ever crawled inside of was a school in Mexico City during the 1985 earthquake. Every child was under its desk. Every…

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Write Your Heart Out

RedPedalCar

My earliest memory is of my second birthday. Mom and Dad gave me a shiny red pedal car. I can’t describe the joy I felt at having my very own car, I must have been glowing. I climbed inside to take it for a spin, only to find my feet didn’t touch the pedals, but I that was okay, I knew I would grow into it.

“I’ll trade it for a tricycle,” Dad said, and Mom agreed.

“No! I don’t want a trike, I want the car, my legs will grow,” I thought, but for some reason, I didn’t tell Dad. I was terribly disappointed when he took the car away.

That positive attitude has stuck with me all my life.

If I want to do it, I find a way to make it work. But even though I have confidence in myself, it hasn’t been easy for me to be confident in how others perceive me. I have always worried that others will think I’m silly for believing myself capable of a thing.

When my first marriage ended in divorce, I felt as if everyone looked down on me.

Even God. I focused on my failures. Though I condemned myself, and thought God could no longer use me, I still prayed and read my Bible daily. Then one day God spoke to my heart, “Martha, I never intended for you or anyone else to divorce, but no one is perfect, including you.

I still love you, and have a plan for you.”

That day, I know for sure I glowed with happiness, as tears of joy ran down my cheeks. The words of Psalm 139 that I was so familiar with, took on new meaning as I read them that day. And today, as I read the psalm again, I am assured that God knows everything there is to know about me. He knows all my thoughts, my  plans, my desires, and my fears.

God knows me better than I know myself, and He accepts me as I am.

Several years ago God gave me a desire to write. I had always used writing as a learning tool, but this was different. Now I was writing with purpose. I asked God to show me what He wanted me to learn as I read my Bible each morning…and I wrote. I found myself writing bits and pieces of my thoughts and my life. I poured my stories out on the page, a little at a time.

This isn’t a Bible study,” I scolded myself, “This is about me.”

But it seemed God was saying to me, “You’re writing what I want you to, just keep writing.” So I did. An amazing thing happened. As I read my writings, I saw the protagonist, the main character of those stories, through different eyes. As she shared her heart, I related to her. I understood her. I accepted her.

As I began to understand myself, I found my writing voice.

I quit shaming myself and instead, asked God to show me how to use my experiences to help others. My mission statement is “helping others find their passion by sharing my own.”  I propose to do this by accepting and encouraging others any way I can. If you haven’t already done it, I want to encourage you to do as I did, and—

Write Your Heart Out!

by Martha Jane Curtis

Absence Excused–Not Guilty!

This past summer has been full with grandchildren. I chose spending time with them over posting. At first I felt guilty for neglecting my blog.

“What kind of reputation are you making for yourself?” I asked.

“That depends,” the answer came, “on what your goals are.”

“My goal is for these children to know that God loves them even more than I do.” I said. “I want them to know the importance of having a relationship with God.”

“Then you better take the time to teach them and show them now. They are getting older. What if they don’t want to spend next summer with grandma? You can write and blog after they go home. Make the most of the time you have with them now. You may not get another chance.”

Guilty or Not?

And so, I made the conscious choice to spend as much time as I could with my grandkids. We went camping, hiking, swimming and played in the park. We ate pizza three times a week and had ice cream nearly every day.

We read books aloud to each other and talked about dragons. We played checkers and chess. We prayed before meals, and at night before bed. We talked about what they wanted to be when they grew up, and about remembering to read the Bible and pray every day.

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Then it was over. I had to take them back home, 600 miles away. The time we had together was so short. I no longer feel guilt over the posts I didn’t write. Instead, I am glad for the talks we had and the connections we made. I cherish the time spent with them and look forward to next summer for more of the same–and I pray they don’t grown up too much between now and then.

 

Originally appeared marthajanecurtis.weebly.com on 7-23-14 titled Guilty or Not?

A Cup of Coffee to Direct My Steps to Make a Difference

Each morning upon awakening, I grope my way to the bathroom, my eyes not yet focusing, then stumble back to the bedroom. I clumsily arrange pillows against the headboard into a comfortable place to sit while I coax my eyes open and will my brain to engage. A few minutes later Joe appears with my stainless steel mug filled with strong black coffee, a spoon for sipping until it cools enough to drink and a strawberry breakfast bar.

blessing or warmth

Joe started this act of kindness several years ago, not long after I realized  the benefits of consuming the beverage on a regular basis.

–It gives me an excuse to sit through a much needed wake-up time.

–It provides the boost that keeps me from falling back into sleep.

–It washes down the snack that provides me with enough energy to cook a more nutritious breakfast.

Bonus: –It makes me feel loved for Joe to voluntarily bring it to me each morning.

The first few sips of coffee and the sunlight streaming through my bedroom window serve to help my eyes focus. As I reach for my Bible I breathe a quick prayer, asking God to teach me something new.

Today I added to that prayer, “Help me make a difference in someone’s life today.”

I picked up my journal and read my notes from the last few days. “A man’s heart deviseth his way: but the Lord directeth his steps.” Proverbs 16:9 KJV

prov 16-9

I can’t count how many times I have read, written or quoted this verse. I have seen it fulfilled many times throughout my life. As I began to think on this, I made my plans for this day.

The basic plan was already laid. Joe and I had made a pact to work every day in our rented storage building until we get it under control. Today marks the second week of our labor. We set up tables in front of the building, filling them with junk that we hope will become someone else’s treasure and put enough dollars in our pocket to pay the storage rent for another month.

As I continued sipping my coffee, my thoughts wandered to three young girls who pass by each day on their way home from school. The two older girls go straight home, but eight year old Cheyenne, small enough to pass for five or six, stops to talk. She asks about the things we have for sale, and without pausing, rattles on, answering her own questions. She is intelligent and a quick thinker.

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She reminds me of my nineteen year old daughter, Mariah, when she was that age. Mariah could carry on intelligent conversation with adults and most people liked her. A few, though, did not want to be bothered by a kid. I like Cheyenne, but I don’t have time to talk to her. I have work to do. I just want her to go so I can get my storage job finished and spend some time at home cooking, cleaning and writing—the things I have put off in honor of my pact with Joe.

But here I am this morning drinking coffee and asking God to direct my steps today, and I think of Cheyenne—not just Cheyenne, but her sister and their friend. God is telling me I can make a difference in those girls’ lives.

This afternoon, three girls got off the school bus. Three girls stopped to talk. Each clamored for attention. I sat in my chair this afternoon, listening to and talking to those young girls. I did not feel the usual guilt or pressure to be up cleaning, sorting and organizing. I was at peace with what I was doing this day.

God wanted me to sit and listen and talk with those little girls today. I don’t know His reasons, but I am thankful for those little girls, Joe, the coffee, and the time to meditate on God’s words. But most of all, I am thankful for God, who directs my steps and allows me to make a difference.